𝘋𝘦𝘴𝘪𝘨𝘯𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘊𝘢𝘱𝘵𝘪𝘰𝘯𝘴: 𝘋𝘪𝘴𝘳𝘶𝘱𝘵𝘪𝘷𝘦 𝘦𝘹𝘱𝘦𝘳𝘪𝘮𝘦𝘯𝘵𝘴 𝘸𝘪𝘵𝘩 𝘵𝘺𝘱𝘰𝘨𝘳𝘢𝘱𝘩𝘺, 𝘤𝘰𝘭𝘰𝘳, 𝘪𝘤𝘰𝘯𝘴, 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘦𝘧𝘧𝘦𝘤𝘵𝘴

Alie, AI, in The 100, a white 30s brunette woman with long hair over her right shoulder and to the front, wearing a red dress with a black accent, presented with custom creative font style by Sean Zdenek for her lines, "Your thoughts are chemical. Mine are digital."
Caption copyright Sean Zdenek.

Sean Zdenek's webtext 𝘋𝘦𝘴𝘪𝘨𝘯𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘊𝘢𝘱𝘵𝘪𝘰𝘯𝘴: 𝘋𝘪𝘴𝘳𝘶𝘱𝘵𝘪𝘷𝘦 𝘦𝘹𝘱𝘦𝘳𝘪𝘮𝘦𝘯𝘵𝘴 𝘸𝘪𝘵𝘩 𝘵𝘺𝘱𝘰𝘨𝘳𝘢𝘱𝘩𝘺, 𝘤𝘰𝘭𝘰𝘳, 𝘪𝘤𝘰𝘯𝘴, 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘦𝘧𝘧𝘦𝘤𝘵𝘴 is a fascinating read and uplifting reprieve from the doldrums of a world full of craptions.

"Re-imagined boundaries" in captioning of the future and making room for innovation: "In caption studies, we need to imagine film space differently." He says, "It is time to make room for captions." It's an exciting, provocative and blessedly creative look at custom captioning experimentation.

Abstract

In this webtext, I experiment with novel forms of audiovisual accessibility. Enhanced captioning (also called kinetic, embodied, integral, dynamic, and animated captioning) offers radical alternatives to the taken-for-granted landscape of captioning and sonic accessibility. It disrupts norms and asks us to imagine different disability futures. By blending form and meaning, enhanced captions become integral components of the creative text instead of add-ons or afterthoughts. At the least, they force us to reflect on the problematic relationships between programs and captions, producers and captioners, and how we might bring them closer together.

Read the text at https://lnkd.in/eRd2Fw7 

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“I wish I had heard all of my dad’s eulogy”: Hearing Aids as a New Lease on Life

Patricia MacDonald is one of a few editorial colleagues with a story to share about hearing. Hers is honest and hopeful. I'm taking her words to heart as I go to get my hearing retested later this month.

She also touches on how she uses closed captioning, reminding us that not all users are totally deaf or "hearies" using captions for other reasons.

 

Headshot of Patricia Morris MacDonald.

I can’t remember when I started noticing my hearing loss. I was probably in my late 20s. I do know the exact moment I couldn’t deny any longer that it was a problem: when I couldn’t hear everything my brother was saying as he was delivering my father’s eulogy. What a thing to miss. 

But still I didn’t get my hearing checked. I knew I needed hearing aids, but I didn’t want to wear them. Hearing aids are for old people, I thought. Everyone will notice them. So I struggled on for another few years, constantly frustrated when I caught only bits of conversations, wondering what I had missed when others around me were laughing at something I hadn’t heard. My husband bought me a cheap little device that amplified sound, and I used that a lot, especially when I was watching TV. It worked great but could only do so much. I was still missing out on a lot in real life.  

I did eventually get my hearing tested, and the results were as expected: significant hearing loss in both ears. The culprit? Otosclerosis. Basically there was a hardening of the bones in my middle ear, and they were unable to vibrate properly in order to conduct sound. The good news? I was a perfect candidate for hearing aids. The bad news? I was a perfect candidate for hearing aids. I still didn’t want them, and it was at least another year before I finally went for a fitting.  

The catalyst was an editing conference I attended in Ottawa in 2012. The sessions were fine because I had my trusty sound booster with me; socializing, however, was a different story. One-on-one interaction was okay for the most part, but put me around a table in a noisy restaurant and I was lost. I still ended up having a wonderful time, but it was a wake-up call. I needed to do something.  

So I took the leap and got two hearing aids. And suddenly I could hear all that I was missing—and it was a lot, trust me. I was very grateful for this new lease on life, although I was extremely self-conscious for the first little while, the first couple of years, even. To this day I’m still a little self-conscious. But I can hear better, and that’s really all that matters. 

Hearing aids aren’t the perfect solution, though. I often have trouble hearing on the phone and when I’m in a crowded room. I still miss some things.

Closed captioning has become a good friend, especially when I’m watching a show with fast dialogue or accents.

So there’s still frustration. But I can function almost normally again. And I must say that when I “take my ears out” at night, I welcome the quiet and enjoy a good sleep. It’s not all bad. :^) 

It’s taken a while, but I’ve come to terms with my hearing loss—I have a disability that fortunately I was able to correct. I just wish I had done it years earlier. I wish I had heard all of my dad’s eulogy. But I was thinking about how I would look instead of how I could hear. If you have hearing loss and are hesitant about trying hearing aids, for whatever reason, I urge you to give them a shot. It will change your life for the better.  

 

Patricia MacDonald is a freelance copyeditor in Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, specializing in sports books and memoirs, guides for athletes and coaches, and textbooks for physical education and kinesiology students.

She can be reached at powerplayediting@gmail.com.

 

Photo courtesy of P. MacDonald.

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Cinema Gets Heritage Status

 

I'm sharing this good news as posted. I worked at these theatres (as did my dad as projectionist) with Dawn and Dan's father Peter.

 

City grants Mt. Pleasant theatre heritage status

Davisville landmarks opened in the ’20s and continue to show films today

 

 

Published: 

 

Councillor Josh Matlow stands outside Mount Pleasant Theatre

Councillor Josh Matlow stands outside Mount Pleasant Theatre

The Regent Theatre and Mount Pleasant Theatre have both been a prominent part of Davisville village since the 1920s. Now, thanks to a motion put forward by councillor Josh Matlow of Ward 22, St. Paul’s, both buildings will stay that way. The two theatres were granted heritage status by the Toronto and East York Community Council in May.

“These movie houses are iconic institutions in our Midtown neighbourhood,” said Matlow. “When you come to the Davisville village, they stand out. They tell you where you are and give you a sense of identity and a story in the community. This is clearly linked to the architectural and cultural story of our community.”

The designation comes at an important time as several historic buildings in Midtown have been torn down in recent years, including the century-old Bank of Montreal building at Yonge Street and Roselawn Avenue and the Stollerys building at Yonge and Bloor Street.

“These movie houses are iconic institutions in our Midtown neighbourhood.”

Mount Pleasant Theatre, at 675 Mt Pleasant Rd., opened in 1926 and is one of Toronto’s oldest surviving movie theatres.

Regent Theatre, at 551 Mount Pleasant Rd., opened in 1927 as the Belsize Theatre. The marquee on the building facade and the architectural styling of the building represent the work of architect Murray Brown, who was well-known for designing movie theatres across Canada.

Both theatres are currently owned by Dawn and Dan Sorokolit. While a heritage designation is widely considered an honour that ensures a building will remain a part of Toronto’s history, it’s possible the theatres’ owners might not be happy about the designation. Moving forward, any plans to demolish or build overtop of either property will be subject to further approval from Heritage Preservation Services.

Post City reached out to the owners about the designation, however neither was available for comment.

“The theatres really are important to the landscape and the streetscape along Mount Pleasant Road.… They were both built at a time when the city was really expanding northward,” said Kaitlin Wainwright, director of programming at Heritage Toronto. “They really are touchstones in a way that hearkens back to that period of change.”

Although community theatres across Toronto have largely been replaced by big multiplexes, like the Scotiabank Theatre, Mount Pleasant and Regent theatres both continue to show films today.

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